Tips for Making Journaling Part of Your Daily Routine

The way to ensure that journaling works for you is to do it long term. Long-term journaling gives you more insight into your life because you’ll be able to reflect on the past, present, and even the future (sort of) to try to get answers in your life.  

But first, you must dive in and do it steadily. And you need to do it daily to make it a consistent habit. Below are some simple tips for making journaling part of your daily routine.

  • Make It Easy – If you don’t make it a huge deal, it’ll be simpler to get done. For example, it’s easier to use a pen and paper rather than a computer for most people. You can have the book in your bag or on your bedside table or wherever you plan to write. I personally find it useful to keep it nearby at all times in case inspiration strikes at some random moment.

  • Select a Time That Works For You – The best times to journal are early morning or right before you go to bed. However, these times might not work for some people. If you know a better time, do it. For example, some people like journaling while on lunch at work. It’s up to you. Think of what part of the day that you have the most creative energy and opportunity, and then try to include doing some journaling during that time.

  • Get a Drink and Eat a Snack – Don’t allow your mind to manufacture any excuses or extraneous thoughts while you’re journaling. Make sure you’re fed and hydrated before you get started.

  • Create a Comfortable and Accessible Space – It’s easier to delve into your thoughts if you’re comfortable and not thinking about how bad your backside hurts on a chair or how uncomfortable your wrist feels. Some people like sitting at a desk, some in a comfy chair, while others prefer relaxing in their bed while journaling. Choose wisely.

  • Combine It with Something Else You Enjoy Doing – If you enjoy working out, why not journal right after you are done? If you have a daily activity, add journaling to it. It’s a variation of habit stacking and it’ll help to establish your new journaling habit quickly.

  • Use Relaxing Music to Set the Mood – I know that some people prefer silence, and that’s okay if you do. But consider trying some music that doesn’t have words and that you find relaxing. It might help you to gather your thoughts and to remain calm and focused.

  • Utilize a Particular Type of Journal – For some people, using a style of journaling like bullet journaling, prayer journaling, project journaling, and more, works better since it defines some rules for entry. The constraints can help guide you towards your goal.

  •  Consider Using Prompts – With a simple Google search, you can discover journaling prompts for any type of journal you want to use.

  • Reward Yourself – When you have been diligent for a month writing in your journal, take some time to read what you wrote, then reward yourself for succeeding.

To truly experience the full benefits of journaling, it needs to be done nearly every day. Therefore you need to find savvy ways to incorporate journaling into your daily life. The best way to accomplish this is to make it easy and turn it into a habit.

From Dream to Literary Greatness

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If you’ve ever written anything, from a paper to a novel, you know how hard it can be to come up with the best ideas. Writer’s block hits us all from time to time, and that includes published authors. Authors work very hard to craft compelling stories that their readers will not only enjoy, but love. For many this takes years of hard work and planning. It may even mean hundreds of rejections, thousands of edits and loads of re-writing. They may draw upon their own life experiences, or the tales of others, or simply upon their imagination. Some authors however, get lucky and dream the entire thing. 

Since science is still a little uncertain as to why we have dreams in the first place, they have an almost mystical quality about them. It may not be magic, but it can seem like it. Our dreams can be filled with bizarre creatures, people, and scenarios. Even from mundane activities to fantastical situations, they can be quite memorable. For some authors, this makes them a great starting point for novel ideas. 

If you yourself are an aspiring writer or creative, there may be a way for you to tap into your dreams as well. Thinking of your book or project as you fall asleep is one of the best ways to dream about it. Even if you aren’t lucky enough to stumble upon inspiration as you sleep, it’s important to remember that creativity is deeply personal, and finding what works for you can take time. For the full list of books inspired by dreams, plus some tips on creativity, check out this link and visual by Sleep Advisor: 

https://www.sleepadvisor.org/books-inspired-by-dreams/

 

Personal Development on a Budget

Photo by  Samuel Zeller  on  Unsplash

I have another new-ish article over on Medium as part of my Secondhand Inspiration Project series called Personal Development on a Budget. If you get a chance, check it out.

It’s all about discovering various low cost, high yield ways that you can improve yourself, even when your money is tight or your free time is at a premium. The article was motivated by the following quote:

“Personal development is the belief that you are worth the effort, time and energy needed to develop yourself.” ―Denis Waitley

I hope you find this article useful. Be good.

https://medium.com/datadriveninvestor/personal-development-on-a-budget-6b2240709288?source=friends_link&sk=856c07dfd104dc438932e83b55db53a1

Finally.

Stop Before You Start

My newest post for The Secondhand Inspiration Project over on Medium is focused on Avoiding Bad Habits that Die Hard with Warren Buffett

The quote that I used as kindle for my flame is: “Chains of habit are too light to be felt until they are too heavy to be broken.”

Develop enough discipline to avoid any new bad habits. And stay inspired.

https://medium.com/datadriveninvestor/stop-before-you-start-8fa1b683d766?source=friends_link&sk=d696a50d7bbd0167acf50ae67745f970

Resource - Top Promo Tips from The Muse and The Marketplace 2019

This resource is such a goldmine that I must share it.

As Tyrone Li mentions on the BookBub site, GrubStreet held their annual Muse & The Marketplace conference for writers in April. There, "authors, agents, and editors hosted talks and panels on craft, the publishing process, and book promotion strategies. We gathered lots of helpful publishing insights and promotional tips on a variety of topics, from marketing on social media to participating in bookstore events-- and even to dealing with author envy! We're excited to share some of these tips with our readers who couldn't attend, and hope you find these takeaways useful."

You'll find those tips online at https://insights.bookbub.com/promo-tips-muse-marketplace-2019/. There is some great information here. For me, the author social media hints and the insights on juggling a day job with your writing practice to be particularly helpful.

Lessons Learned from Female Literary Characters

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Literature is incredibly important for personal growth. Many lessons we learn are from the books we read with characters that stick out to us in a special way. Set aside time to read some of the remarkable tales of women in literature, you’ll be astonished at some of the epiphanies you will takeaway to incorporate into your life.

If you are still looking to find some great lessons to learn from female figures, why not pick up a book with one of the best female literary characters! Redbubble.com has put together a list of 12 Lessons We Learned From Female Literary Characters including quotes and the messages we derive from those excerpts. We never stop learning if we never stop reading. Happy reading and learning, go women!

https://www.redbubble.com/life/female-literary-characters/

 

Inspire Your Inner Lion

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My newest post for The Secondhand Inspiration Project over on Medium is titled Being Brave with Mary Tyler Moore.

The quote that I used as kindle for my flame is: “Take chances, make mistakes. That’s how you grow. Pain nourishes your courage. You have to fail in order to practice being brave.”

Stay inspired.

https://medium.com/@adrianpotter/inspire-your-inner-lion-f99f1dd92740?source=friends_link&sk=9477d2e4dd7e22379dd0571136ecd5af

Advice on Submitting Your Poems

Photo by  Frame Harirak  on  Unsplash

For those who are looking for a little bit of guidance in finding a home for their poems, I have dusted off and reposted an awesome resource. Check out “How To Submit Poems To Literary Journals And Magazines” at Writer’s Relief. Follow these seven steps and you’ll find your work in the limelight in quick fashion.

http://writersrelief.com/2010/01/11/how-to-submit-poems-to-literary-journals-and-magazines/?fbclid=IwAR0dNHqY4hVS6MmrpmWSdFLpDo1sbr00EBYK9J_h8NSgNokW0XwXEYTt0hQ

Introducing…The Secondhand Inspiration Project!

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What is The Secondhand Inspiration Project?

It’s a new mission I’ve developed over on Medium. Periodically, I pull together a post that starts with a motivational quote and goes wherever my musings lead. The idea was born out of my obsession with inspirational quotes and self-help books. This, mixed with a need to sometimes use prompts for my daily writing practice, sparked this initiative.

I already have several entries at Medium for The Secondhand Inspiration Project. My goal is to post some links to catch everyone up on this relatively new pet project. From there, I’ll be sure to update this blog after every new entry.

The first entry of The Secondhand Inspiration Project, Go Farther, was based on a famous quote by Wayne Dyer: "It's never crowded along the extra mile." Check out this post and just maybe it will provide you with a little secondhand inspiration.

https://medium.com/@adrianpotter/go-further-a7413df120a4?source=friends_link&sk=fbf834d3db736379c3c4c5ff057bec48

Must Read Books that Have Made the Largest Impact

Photo by  Glen Noble  on  Unsplash

Photo by Glen Noble on Unsplash

The right words ignite a spark for change. They lead movements, challenge societal norms, and question authority. And when a writer decides to pen their stimulating thoughts onto paper, people read them over and over. Their books spread throughout the world, inspiring people to take new paths and introducing them to their unique perspective.

The books that have made the largest impact throughout history date back to the early ages of 1000 C.E. up to the dynamic modern era of the early 2000s. And people still flip through their pages, craving to absorb the timeless knowledge from each writer.  

There are religious texts, like the Torah, the Quran and the Bible, then there are philosophical and political musings like The Communist Manifesto by Karl Marx and The Jungle by Upton Sinclair. Millions of people flock to grab a copy and align it with their values. Other books marked important steps towards international human rights, like Thomas Paine’s work of The Rights of Man.

Of course, the above mentioned are only a small sampling. Largest assembled this list of 25 powerful and influential books, so you can explore a host of other masterpieces that people still read today through their list.

https://largest.org/culture/books-largest-impact/

Author Website TIps

Photo by  Raul Varzar  on  Unsplash

Photo by Raul Varzar on Unsplash

Poets and writers are always looking for a way to “pop” and appear vivid against the blah backdrop of the internet. Creatives are attention whores – me included - and the only way to make an impression and find greater success is to stand out.

As part of my endless/obsessive pursuit of improvement, I discovered this new-ish article by Robert Lee Brewer about “five things author websites need to find more success.” There are some solid takeaways that both experienced and novice writers with websites can put into practice and find results. Enjoy.

https://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/5-things-author-websites-need-to-find-more-success

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Closing the Deal.

Writers spend a lot of time focusing on the craft of opening lines. This is true for fiction, poetry, essay, and even speeches. But what about endings? Aren’t they important, too?

Of course they are. And in this piece from the Washington Post, Ron Charles gives some much-deserved love to some of the more impactful closing lines in literature.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2019/entertainment/books/best-last-lines/?utm_term=.662e77c2e80c

How To Feel The Funk

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It’s been a long time, I shouldn’t have left you…but I’m now back on the blogging horse, ready to ride again.

Though I’ve been silent on here, I’ve been showcasing my voice all over the place. I’ll slowly catch everyone up on my latest publications and new projects in the next few weeks on this blog.

First up – I want to announce my new-ish micro-chapbook of six poems called “How to Feel the Funk” published by the Origami Poems Project. So get down, get into the groove, and go get your electronic copy of this micro-chap here.

https://www.origamipoems.com/poets/366-adrian-s-potter

5 Quick Daily Writing Exercises You Can Practice

It’s not unreasonable to say that the number one problem most writers have is that they just don’t write enough. Writing, even professionally, is often treated as a side venture, or something that is inherently doable at a moment’s notice. The truth though is that it’s a skill, and like any other skill it must be practiced and nurtured to be its best. In other words, anyone fancying him or herself a writer needs to find a good excuse to write creatively and/or intellectually every single day. ‘'

Because of this, there’s actually a fairly strong market of prompt and exercise books aimed at writers. The thinking is that if you simply have an idea in front of you, you won’t have trouble putting pen to paper. As helpful as these books can be though, they’re not strictly necessary. With a little creativity you can come up with some daily exercises of your own, and help to ensure that you get at least a little bit of practice in every day.

A few ideas to get you started….

1. Just Write Titles

Sometimes you just don’t feel like you can get the words down to do anything substantial, and while some writers contend that you need to force through those times, there are other solutions as well. One is to simply write titles of things you’d like to write. It’s simple and quick enough that you can turn it into a daily exercise, even if that means just 10 or 15 titles a day - be they for stories, books, essays, or even films or songs. It’s not a robust writing exercise by any means, but it does activate that part of your brain, and it can give you some ideas of things to work on.

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2. Go For A Jog, Write About It After

Writing just about a jog isn’t the most exciting thing in the world, but if you go running outside chances are you’ll see other people out, pass by interesting places, or even see animals or other elements of nature that intrigue you. These are the kinds of things that can inspire any writer, and it’s a worthwhile idea to practice your observational skills anyway. Throw in the fact that exercise can chemically stimulate creativity as well, and it’s actually an excellent way to put yourself in a writing mindset. A quick jog and then a series of stories or vignettes about the things you observed while out can be an excellent daily, or at least near-daily activity.

3. Play Daily Fantasy, & Write Up Recaps

This is an idea that will make sense to a lot of people who play fantasy sports, because some of the leading sites have started writing automated recaps of contests. You can turn this into your own exercise by turning to daily fantasy, which involves a range of contest styles but more importantly runs every day. That means with each and every night you can have a contest to recap creatively, the way a sportswriter might do it. It seems somewhat random, but the idea is to have something fresh to discuss and shape into written thoughts on a daily basis. Plus, if you’re a sports fan at all, it’s quite a lot of fun to do.

4. Find Launch Points

One of the most common writing practices out there is to base your work off of somebody else’s (provided you’re not intending to sell that particular work of course). You might pick up a favorite book, open to a random chapter, record the first few sentences and then close it and continue the story your own way, for instance. That’s just one example, but wherever you can find these “launch points” for a story, you should give it a shot. At a certain point, repetition - the act of writing a story every day, no matter how small - is the best practice.

5. Try A Dream Journal

There’s a lot of pseudoscience behind remembering, analyzing, and recording dreams. You can try different ways of remembering your dreams though, and if any of them work you can simply start writing about your dreams in the morning. Waking up an extra 15 minutes early (easier said than done, of course) gives you time to write a few words about what you remember or what you think about it, or even to write a little story about it. This is a particularly fun exercise if you can make it work, because it’s almost like your own brain is feeding you prompts.

Really, it all comes down to creativity and resourcefulness. There are many ideas beyond these that can lead you to daily writing in a very effective way. Just be sure to keep that pen moving day in and day out, and you’ll become a better writer for it.

Three Mistakes.

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Whether we admit it or not, we all make mistakes. This article by Kyle Massa on the ProWriting Aid website will help you correctly use some of the most commonly misused words. Full disclosure – I’m guilty of number two on this list, but now I know better.

https://prowritingaid.com/art/722/3-commonly-misused-words-(and-how-to-use-them-correctly).aspx?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=misused